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==Draft Survey Questions==
 
==Draft Survey Questions==
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Welcome to the Participation 3.0 start-up survey.
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Your response matters. It will shape our Ford Foundation-funded "Next Generation Ideas" process led by E-Democracy.org.
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By the end of 2010, we will collaboratively propose the top ten ideas for what should be universal to all local communities with the next generation of local online civic engagement - transparency, participation, collaboration, problem-solving and community building.
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To make something "universal" we will develop system changing ideas and proposals that redefine the foundation for what is required to be an effective local democracy and a strong vibrant and open community. Past generations brought us free elections, open meeting and public notice laws, Freedom of Information, community service clubs and voluntarism, and more. Will today's generation be satisfied with our local government simply has a "website" or they use Twitter check box, or will we aspire set the bar at something truly transforming.
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1. Updates - Would you like important updates on the Participation 3.0 initiative?
 
1. Updates - Would you like important updates on the Participation 3.0 initiative?
  
 
If yes, enter your e-mail address:
 
If yes, enter your e-mail address:
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2. Your Perspective - Please select up to three identities or perspectives that best represents you.
 
2. Your Perspective - Please select up to three identities or perspectives that best represents you.
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2. Open Question - You decided to come to this survey. What matters to you? Or more specifically, what would you like to see "online" for your local community? What big idea do you have?  What's important to you with local online civic engagement? Share your hopes, desires, or current successes online in your local community.
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2. Open Question - What matters to you? What big idea do you have? Or more specifically, what would you like to see "online" for your local community? What's important to you with local online civic engagement? Share your hopes, desires, or current successes online in your local community.
  
  
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3. Your Priorities - In a world of limited resources and time, confusion about what should be tackled first is leading to inaction. When it comes to participation and transparency online, "demand" is often not expressed nor measured. The public does not "comparison shop" between local government, media, or community sites far away, so they do not ask or something they haven't seen or envisioned. This is where you come in. Let's prioritize the demand for innovation and action among those most interested.
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3. Your Priorities - In a world of limited resources and time, confusion about what should be tackled first lead to no action in the vast majority of communities. When it comes to participation and transparency online, "demand" is often not expressed nor measured. The public does not "comparison shop" between local government, media, or community sites far away, so they do not ask or something they haven't seen or envisioned.  
  
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This is where you come in. Let's prioritize the demand for innovation and action to guide our explorations this year.
  
  
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4. Question on local data sets/data services - what do you want out first
 
4. Question on local data sets/data services - what do you want out first
  
There is a big idea out there that governments should release more raw data about important things for others to freely present to the public in innovative ways. The current real-life example is that the National Weather Service collects weather information and you access you local information through your the media and other others rather than the government directly.
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There is a big idea out there that governments should release more "open data" about important things for others to freely present to the public in innovative ways. The current real-life example is that the National Weather Service collects weather information. With government funded weather information, you tend to access your localized information through the media or online rather than the government directly.
  
Getting this data out of from governments or organized into standard formats is a major undertaking that requires prioritization.
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Getting this often real-time data out of governments or organized into standard formats is a major undertaking that requires prioritization.
  
 
Who are you?
 
Who are you?

Revision as of 14:14, 11 March 2010

Draft Survey Questions

Welcome to the Participation 3.0 start-up survey.

Your response matters. It will shape our Ford Foundation-funded "Next Generation Ideas" process led by E-Democracy.org.

By the end of 2010, we will collaboratively propose the top ten ideas for what should be universal to all local communities with the next generation of local online civic engagement - transparency, participation, collaboration, problem-solving and community building.

To make something "universal" we will develop system changing ideas and proposals that redefine the foundation for what is required to be an effective local democracy and a strong vibrant and open community. Past generations brought us free elections, open meeting and public notice laws, Freedom of Information, community service clubs and voluntarism, and more. Will today's generation be satisfied with our local government simply has a "website" or they use Twitter check box, or will we aspire set the bar at something truly transforming.


1. Updates - Would you like important updates on the Participation 3.0 initiative?

If yes, enter your e-mail address:


2. Your Perspective - Please select up to three identities or perspectives that best represents you.

Public and Community

  • General Public - Everyday Citizen
  • Active Citizen - Political
  • Active Citizen - Neighborhood or Community Service Volunteer
  • Non-Profit Organization
  • Researcher

Government

  • Civil Servant - General
  • Elected Official or Staff Member
  • Government "Webmaster"
  • Government IT - Tech-oriented
  • Government Communications Staff
  • Librarian

"Opener"

  • Open Government Advocate
  • Participatory/Deliberative Democracy Proponent
  • Direct Democracy Proponent
  • Blogger
  • Journalist

Technology

  • Technologist - Software Developer, Web Developer, Geek, etc.
  • Creative - Internet/Social Media/Online Design Expert
  • Business - Government Technology Provider/Company



2. Open Question - What matters to you? What big idea do you have? Or more specifically, what would you like to see "online" for your local community? What's important to you with local online civic engagement? Share your hopes, desires, or current successes online in your local community.


Next page


3. Your Priorities - In a world of limited resources and time, confusion about what should be tackled first lead to no action in the vast majority of communities. When it comes to participation and transparency online, "demand" is often not expressed nor measured. The public does not "comparison shop" between local government, media, or community sites far away, so they do not ask or something they haven't seen or envisioned.

This is where you come in. Let's prioritize the demand for innovation and action to guide our explorations this year.



Three clusters of ~10 big ideas/themes - Choose what you think is most important/should be universal

This will be a laundry list of ideas - goal figure out what is most important to people and look for overlapping support among constituencies.


4. Question on local data sets/data services - what do you want out first

There is a big idea out there that governments should release more "open data" about important things for others to freely present to the public in innovative ways. The current real-life example is that the National Weather Service collects weather information. With government funded weather information, you tend to access your localized information through the media or online rather than the government directly.

Getting this often real-time data out of governments or organized into standard formats is a major undertaking that requires prioritization.

Who are you?

A. Everyday citizen - I am someone who wants to be able to look up inf A. Someone who "want data" to reuse, answer

If you "have data" as government to share

Next page


  • Should the "transparency, participation, and collaboration" themes from federal Open Government Directive be actively addressed or examined by your local governments?


5. Get connected/informed options


1A. Are you a current participant on any of E-Democracy.org's community Issues Forums?

 

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